Editing Hell

Editing Hell

It’s time for an update! This is going to be a long, looong wall of text, so strap yourselves in, bring forth the coffee, and peel your tired self off the floor (wait… you don’t lie on the floor when you’re so tired you can barely move—is that just me?) and pay attention!

Are you ready?

Okay, so… I’m planning (hoping, praying, begging my characters) to have Assembly done at some point during the first half of this year. More on that below.

Anyway… People have expressed an interest in learning a little about my editing process (the process in which my soul dies a little each day), and since I’m editing Assembly at the moment, I thought I’d give you some insight. Now, this whole thing below was originally sent as a two-part Newsletter. If you subscribed to my newsletter before the third of January this year and you didn’t receive the two emails, then that means the evil (EVIL) email providers have put my mail straight in your trash/junk/spam folder where it gets deleted after only a few days. So… whitelist my email or it will just keep happening (you’re missing out on so much, too)!

If you have not signed up but you want access to my crazy, sign up below.

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Okay, I guess we’re ready. Below is the relevant text from the two emails sent about my editing.

Before the editing story begins…
…you need to know that I wrote the first draft of Hunted, Assembly, and (secret title of book 3) in one go. I did this mostly so that I could be sure there wouldn’t be any inconsistencies or plotholes between the books (and because I was having so much fun and I didn’t want to stop). This meant that by the time I started editing Hunted, it had been about a year since I’d written it (which again meant I’d forgotten a couple of things and made editing much harder). Of course, since I wrote the first draft of Assembly, I have also written (secret title of book 3) and edited Hunted. So about one year. And yes, I know this is not what you’re here for, but it’s important okay! I’m setting the stage for this masterfully woven editing story from hell.

Editing – Step 1: Now look what you did!
This aptly named step one (which is completed btw) is where I spent a week re-reading Assembly while highlighting in my kindle (yes, I moved the book to my kindle) and making big picture notes. Notes like: “This (secret thing) moves too fast, add (secret) scene here.” And, “This character needs to reveal a little more of themselves for this to make sense to anyone other than me.” – Stuff like this is needed because when I draft, it’s pretty rough. I basically write down what I see in my head, what I hear the characters saying (and sometimes they’re so loud that I write only the dialogue), and while that helps me stay true to the characters, it sometimes means scenes and motivation are missing for the reader because all these things are happening in the background, and while I know them, I haven’t written them down yet because I’ve been so busy following a particular part of the story.

This step is named “Now look what you did!” because I’m re-reading the book, having forgotten most the details, and while I enjoyed re-reading many parts of it, I was also left with this feeling of “oh my god there’s so much work to be done, past Erica you’re a total birch for not writing a cleaner draft, how the hell am I supposed to make this reader-ready before I turn 100???”

Editing – Step 2: Let’s make a game plan
You can probably guess, but this step is my planning (while crying big tears of despair) phase. For Assembly, I took a couple of days and made a list of how to get through the editing. First I wrote down what I needed to get done in January, and then I made a (way too demanding) daily schedule. Somehow, I’ve managed to stay on track despite a three-freaking-unholy-week-flu, but more on that (the January to do list, not my flu) next time..

I wouldn’t have minded putting all my editing steps in one email, but I’m chasing down a thousand words here, and I feel it may be overwhelming? Boring? A snooze fest—err, I mean a drool fest?

Editing – Step 3: Let the true torture commence
This is maybe the step I hate the most. It’s boring and horrible and menial, AND it takes for-ducking-ever.

Okay, remember the game plan? This is where I implement the first step, which is read the book SCENE BY SCENE and fill out an excel form (that I made myself) with all the information I need to keep, and all the changes I need to implement in the next editing pass. This can be anything from “add more setting to this scene” (because during my first draft, my “setting” consists of “they walked into the room. It was big.”), to “delete this storyline from every scene in the book and replace with this other storyline.” Sometimes the changes are HUGE, and I know I’m looking at a lot of re-writing, and other times they are small.

This step is boring, because I’ve already read the first draft carefully once, and now I have to do it AGAIN, and be even more attentive while adding my notes and preparing for the work to come.

It took me 16 days to do, with 5 scenes every day. But it’s an important step, because doing it like this, I see the full picture much easier, and it allows me to make sure nothing is rushed, and that everything ties together the way it’s supposed to.

Editing – Step 4: Don’t you wish you were dead?
Step 4 and step 5 tend to happen side by side (I’m currently on these two steps at the moment). Step 4 is where I make my big story edits (there are a lot of them). I call them “big story” because they have ripple effects. For example, if I’m removing an internal conflict, I have to go through all instances of the book where that conflict is touched upon, and I have to rewrite it to make sense without it. For Assembly, one of the changes I made had to do with a specific character arc, and it required several scene changes plus an additional scene to be added for it all to come together.

I also had to change a big thing because of something Ash suddenly did in book 3. Once all the books are released, I’ll tell you about how he just ripped the reins out of my hands and went off on his own.

Editing – Step 5: A brief respite
This step is better because here I get to add new scenes! Basically, I just follow my notes. Where I’ve noticed time gaps, or where I’ve forgotten to include a scene I meant to do, where I’ve noticed an arc moving too fast and needs another step before concluding, or where I feel the characters yelling for more attention—this is the step where I finally get to write them!

It’s fun fun fun!

Step 4 and 5 will probably take about a month to finish.

Editing – Step 6: Let loose the perfectionist
This is the step where I print out the entire book (and use all my paper, all my ink, and all my back up ink—if I go broke, it’s all because of the freakin’ ink) and red pen the whole thing.

I go scene by scene, first red penning every error, every inconstancy, every piece of bad writing (there’s a lot in my first draft), and everything that could be better. I make notes in the margins, and I cross out paragraphs that aren’t needed. Then I take my scene back to the computer, I put my red-penned-scene next to me, and I start editing.

Then I go back to the living room (where I do my red penning), and I do scene 2. And I do this until all the scenes are done. This takes about a month too.

Editing – Step 7: The end is in sight!
Now it’s time for betas. They get the book while I start working on the blurb. Hunted’s blurb took me FOREVER.

When I get my beta stuff back, I go through it and do any fixes/rewrites, and then I work through all the notes I’ve left myself that I’ve saved for last. This is mostly places where I need to tighten or make the writing better, but because it was very difficult, I decided to make it Future Erica’s problem. This never fails to piss Present Erica right off, and if she could go back in time and punch Past Erica, she would. Past Erica is a birch, you guys.

Editing – Step 8: So close!
This is when the book is sent to an editor. With Hunted I couldn’t afford it, but this time I’ve managed to put aside some moneys, and Assembly will experience the horror/joy of an editor’s touch!

Once I get it back from the editor, I’ll spend some time fixing up the issues, and then it’s off to the proofreader. Get it back, fix, and finally it’s time to format.

It takes me about 2 days to format, and once that’s done, it’s time to upload to Amazon—AAAH!

***End of Erica’s last editing rambles***

I hope you’re still awake. If you’re reading this, give me a sign of life. Email me, leave a comment, anything so I know I didn’t write this whole thing only to have everyone fall asleep while reading it, that would be *sob* horrible!

 

36 Responses

  1. kendra says:

    This amazingly insightful and I love that you explained why you do each step!

  2. Anonymous says:

    I found this absolutely insightful. Thank you for sharing!

  3. Daphnne says:

    Ok so I always knew writing a book was crazy hard work but this just clarified how much goes into it. Thanks for the enlightened rant because it makes so much more sense now 🙂

    • Erica Woods says:

      Haha, I’m just relieved my rant didn’t put you to sleep. Each author definitely has their own process, and some of my friends spends much less time editing. I think it depends on what you want out of the thing you create, how cleanly you draft, how long your book is (definitely more things to do when the book is super long), and how effective you are at everything I guess. Hoping I can cut this down when I have some more experience, but knowing my damned obsessive brain, I doubt it.

  4. Terri says:

    I love your insight on this. I’m trying to write a book myself for the first time and it’s really great for me to be able to see how other authors break down their process.

  5. Ellen says:

    I absolutely loved this post—thanks so much for going through this in detail! It’s very interesting and helpful 😊

  6. Edie Spears says:

    Wow it’s such a work intense process when you probably just want to write and create…… Thank you because Hunted was amazing and ok “no pressure” but I truly CANNOT WAIT for Assembly !!

    • Erica Woods says:

      YES! I do just want to write and create, the editing part is hellish, but it’s needed if I want to release the best book I possibly can (which I do want!) And no pressure, I’m just so happy you’re excited to read the next one!

  7. jlwylie says:

    After reading this I guess we all now know why your book is so damned good 🙂 <3

  8. Anonymous says:

    I never realized the numerous amount of steps it takes to edit a book once you have it written. Thanks for this helpful information!

  9. Diana says:

    Sorry about your flu. But your process is just amazing. It shows your dedication to your readers and your characters. I love how your characters just take over. I find it amazing and oddly sweet. I hope you feel better soon, dear. Do not overwork yourself to death.

    • Erica Woods says:

      Thank you! I’m honestly surprised people read this, the post is loooong. And I will try not work too hard, but I can’t promise anything because these characters are impatient!

  10. Sasha says:

    Holy Hera Erica you are incredible! I had no idea sending drafts to editors cost mulla (in retrospect it makes perfect sense). Could you set up a crowdfunding link? I’d love to donate because your writing is so flipping good and I want more! I’m signing up for your newsletter because I’ve been literally stalking your website for any updates on book 2 😅

    P.S. I’m in actual love with Lucien I need to protect him at all costs and CANNOT WAIT for when he falls head over heels for Hope.

    • Erica Woods says:

      Sasha, that’s so sweet! And yes, they cost money, they charge per word so the longer the books is… You get the drift! I wouldn’t feel right taking you guys’ money for that, especially not when you pay to read my book! But the offer was just so heartwarming and really made my day <3

      You're not the only one! I think Lucien's inevitable fall is very anticipated. I just hope I can do it justice!

  11. Anonymous says:

    It was really nice to learn about the process. My biggest pet peeve is when authors don’t finish a series, so I was extremely excited to hear that you have already written the books. I love Hunted and can’t wait to see what Assembly holds.

    • Erica Woods says:

      I will definitely finish all my series! I may even write the first drafts first, like I did with Hunted. Although, that leaves me with many many many months of editing in a row (which I hate). So maybe in the future I will write something in between?

  12. Christina Zepeda says:

    Holy crap girl! So…much…work. The sheer amount of blood, sweat and tears it takes to write these books amazes me. Thank you for taking the time to explain it so thoroughly. I can’t WAIT for Assembly. I’ve already read Hunted 4 times lol.

  13. MaKell Chipman says:

    So basically what you’re saying is we still have to wait like 3 more months!? Ugg! 😂 Thats horrible news!!

  14. cathy says:

    I did read all the way to the end. I’m a reader, but also an author. You made me laugh out loud describing the horrors of editing. All true by the way. What I do is similar in some ways, different in others. But the wanna pull your hair out and shoot the bitch of a boss part? Yup, got that in one. Editing is HARD. I tell people, writing is the easy part. Editing? Marketing…don’t get me started on that one! Horrible, necessary little Gremlins! Best of luck and your editing fingers take flight and fly through each edit with your hair still intact.
    Cathy (Elizabeth Rain)

    • Erica Woods says:

      Aww thank you! And to you as well! Editing is really horrible–drafting, like you said, is the easy part (and the most fun part, too!) and marketing is super hard and time consuming! I wish I had someone to do it for me so I could focus on writing only, but I guess it’s part of being self-published!

  15. Becky Michaud says:

    Thank you for your insight! Not to mention the obvious love and care you have for your books!! I seriously cant wait for the rest of the series!

    • Erica Woods says:

      Thank you for reading my posts and for leaving a comment!❤️ I’m so happy you’re excited for the rest of the series, I hope you’ll enjoy it as much as book 1🥶

  16. Katelyn says:

    After reading the whole thing, my heart broke a little. I have to be patient, ever so patient after picking this up and devouring it in a day. But alas I understand why I devoured it so happily in the first place. Any suggestions of other things to read while I wait for Assembly to come out?

    • Erica Woods says:

      Awww, this was so nice to hear, thank you❤️ And yes, I have some recs on my blog if you look at the books I love tag or book recommendations. There’s also tons of recs floating around my facebook group for hungover readers who’re waiting for Assembly😆

  17. Kalee M Powell says:

    At first I was reading this to try to get an idea of how long I have to wait for Assembly. I just discovered Hunted on Sunday night and I devoured it in 36 hours between work and being a mommy. I’m glad I read this! You put so much effort into your writing and it shows! It’s been a long long time since I’ve mourned over finishing a book. Thank you! I look forward to Assembly and enjoying your hard work.

    • Erica Woods says:

      You have no idea how happy it makes me to hear that you “mourned” finishing my book! Talk about a super boost to my fragile author ego😍 Thank you for reading my book and for caring enough to check out my blog! I’ve made progress in my editing, but still ways to go. Hope to have it ready by end of May, but may be a little longer.

  18. Marie says:

    This is really great! As an aspiring writer myself you d given me some good tips to go by, so thank you! I always struggle with what exactly I should do before I delve in. I usually set up a google doc and make character sheets to plan out my characters appearance, age, bio’s, etc. as well as any ideas I conjure up, but it’s definitely not really organized. I really need to work on my pre-writing routine that’s for sure!!

    On a slightly different note, I’m super excited for the sequel! Since Hunted released and after I read it (I read it SUPER fast btw), I have been dedicatedly checking up/checking back in waiting for a release date. I can’t wait to read what you have in store for everyone! Keep up the amazing work! I hope you are well and staying safe too in these crazy times! ^_^

    • Erica Woods says:

      Hi Marie! I’m so glad you enjoyed Hunted❤️ And as for preparation before you write, every author does it differently. I prefer really getting to know everything about my characters before I start writing, but I don’t know the plot 100%. In my opinion, if you know your characters inside out, it’s much easier to find the story. Plot is born from characters actions and decisions, so how can you know that unless you know them?

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